MERIC NEWS LETTER

St. Louis County Accounts for One-Quarter of State Payroll Increase

      Missouri increased its payroll total almost $3.6 billion from 2003-2004, according to the
      most recent U.S. Census Bureau data. Total payroll figures for Missouri totaled $79.15
      billion in 2004.

St. Louis County accounted for nearly one quarter of that increase, with $882.4 million in added payroll wages. This, along with a decrease of over 3,000 in paid employees in the county over the same period, indicates an increase in higher-skilled, higher-paying jobs.

Payroll is defined as the sum of all financial records of salaries, wages, bonuses, and deductions.

Missouri’s Counties
St. Louis County’s increase was higher than any county in the state, and higher than the increase for the entire state of Nebraska by $292 million. The total county payroll for the time period was $22.1 billion; Nebraska’s was $23.7 billion.

St. Louis City had the second highest increase in the state, with $514 million more in payroll wages from 2003-04.

Other counties with significant payroll increases were Jackson, St. Charles, Greene, Platte and Clay. Counties with the largest decreases were Cape Girardeau, Dunklin, New Madrid and Barton, all of which experienced a decrease of at least $10 million in payroll wages.

Payroll Wages (County)

County

2004 Annual Payroll ($1,000s)

2003-2004 Change ($1000s)

Percent Change

St. Louis

22,163,768

882,466

4.1

St. Louis City

11,068,132

514,370

4.9

Jackson

12,993,422

405,797

3.2

St. Charles

3,717,872

381,671

11.4

Greene

3,915,613

214,496

5.8

Platte

1,262,243

151,099

13.6

Clay

3,081,558

149,361

5.1

Barton

103,590

-10,081

-8.9

New Madrid

126,180

-11,258

-8.2

Dunklin

158,403

-11,889

-7.0

Cape Girardeau

1,005,538

-18,211

-1.8

The largest percentage increases among Missouri counties occurred in Caldwell (19.3), Daviess (15.4), Johnson (15.2) and Reynolds (14.3). Counties experiencing the greatest percentage decreases were Grundy (-14.8), Schulyer (-10.6), Atchison (-10.2), Barton (-8.9) and New Madrid (-8.2).

 

Missouri’s Neighbors
In Missouri as a whole, payroll wages increased 4.7 percent from 2003 through 2004, just below the national average of 5.3 percent. Missouri topped three of its border states in its percentage increase — Illinois, Iowa and Nebraska.

Payroll Wages (Border States)
State 2004 Annual Payroll ($1000s) 2003-2004 Change ($1000s) Percent Change
Oklahoma 35,597,604 2,042,248 6.1
Arkansas 28,670,925 1,635,603 6
Kentucky 46,163,189 2,395,057 5.5
Tennessee 76,922,192 3,718,554 5.1
Kansas 35,725,813 1,684,867 4.9
Missouri 79,157,172 3,562,241 4.7
Iowa 37,643,817 1,654,586 4.6
Illinois 207,884,485 6,844,194 3.4
Nebraska 23,681,558 589,578 2.6

Missouri’s actual payroll wages increased by $3.6 billion from 2003 to 2004. Only Illinois, at $6.8 billion and Tennessee, at $3.7 billion, had a higher payroll wage increase during this span. And only Illinois had higher total payroll wages in 2004 among border states.

Report by Michael Muin, map by Melissa Lanclos

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