MERIC NEWS LETTER

Foreign Born in Missouri 

The percentage of the population that was foreign born was 3.4 percent in Missouri in 2005, according to the U.S. Census’ American Community Survey (ACS), a new and more timely people count than the decennial census. That percentage was 2.7 percent in 2000, and 1.6 percent in 1990.

How the States Ranked
Missouri ranks 41st in percentage of foreign born. Only Louisiana, Alabama, Kentucky, South Dakota, Wyoming, North Dakota, Montana, Mississippi and West Virginia (just 1.1 percent) rank lower. The percent of the nation as a whole that was foreign born in 2005 was 12.4 percent.
The top state is California, where almost a third of the population is foreign born.

Top Ten States, % Foreign Born

1

California

27.2

2

New York

21.4

3

New Jersey

19.5

4

Florida

18.5

5

Nevada

17.4

6

Hawaii

17.2

7

Texas

15.9

8

Arizona

14.5

9

Massachusetts

14.4

10

Illinois

13.6

More than 1 in 3 residents living in Los Angeles (40.3 percent), San Jose (37.9) and New York (36.6) were not U.S. citizens at birth.

How Missouri Ranked
Kansas City (7.4 percent) and St. Louis (6.7) were at approximately half the national average; Springfield, at 2.8 percent, well below. The city with the largest percentage of foreign born population was Columbia, at 7.9 percent.

No Missouri county has as high a percentage of foreign-born population as Columbia. In Missouri, as in the nation, the foreign-born population resides largely in metropolitan areas. St. Louis County’s percentage is 6.3, Boone’s is 6.0 and Jackson’s 5.7.  

Percent Foreign Born, Select Missouri Counties*

St. Louis City

6.7

St. Louis

6.3

Boone

6.0

Jackson

5.7

Platte

4.7

Clay

3.8

Jasper

3.1

Greene

2.5

St. Charles

2.4

Cass

1.8

Cape Girardeau

1.5

Jefferson

1.3

Christian

1.2

Cole

1.2

Buchanan

0.9

Franklin

0.7

* The ACS has to date fully surveyed only 15 counties plus St. Louis City.


Further ACS Population Data
Further ACS analysis reveals that 12.1 percent of Americans are now over aged 65, and the median age has reached 36.4 years – the oldest ever. Missourians are older still: The median age of Missourians in 2005 was 37.4, and 12.8 percent are over age 65. These trends show no sign of abating.

About the ACS
The American Community Survey is designed to provide more timely and updated information about the nation’s changing and diverse population every year. Without the ACS, this type of information — historically gathered just once a decade — would not be available for communities until 2012. T
he survey is limited to households and excludes those living in institutions, college dormitories and other group quarters.

The ACS is on the web at http://www.census.gov/acs/www/

Source: U.S. Census Bureau 2000 Census and 2005 American Community Survey

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