MERIC NEWS LETTER

Wentzville Is Missouri's
Fastest-Growing City

Wentzville gained 3,349 people and grew over 22.9 percent from July 1, 2004 to July 1, 2005, making it the fastest growing city in Missouri, according to U.S. Census Bureau population estimates of 946 Missouri places. The statewide average was an 0.8 percent increase, or a 28 person gain per place.

Place

July 1, 2005

July 1, 2004

% chg

Wentzville

17,988

14,639

22.9

Lone Jack

697

596

16.9

Oronogo

1,831

1,573

16.4

Battlefield

3,612

3,175

13.8

Wright City

2,440

2,196

11.1

Troy

9,862

8,948

10.2

Cottleville

2,333

2,130

9.5

North Kansas City

5,388

4,920

9.5

Dardenne Prairie

6,984

6,420

8.8

Loma Linda

601

553

8.7

The Tale of the Suburbs
The fastest growing places by percentage were entirely suburban, greater metro area or exurban: tiny Lone Jack, in Jackson County, gained more than 100 people to make it second at 16.9 percent; Oronogo, outside Joplin, 258 people, 16.4 percent; Battlefield, outside Springfield, 437 people, 13.8 percent. 

The fastest growing places in the state by sheer numbers were almost entirely suburban. Wentzville again led the way (3,349), followed by O’Fallon (2,686). Two metro areas were in the top ten, with Columbia falling third in this category, with a gain of 2,011 people; and Kansas City, tenth with a 766 person gain.

Place

July 1, 2005

July 1, 2004

# chg

Wentzville

17,988

14,639

3,349

O'Fallon

69,694

67,008

2,686

Columbia

91,814

89,803

2,011

Lee's Summit

80,338

78,621

1,717

Nixa

15,925

14,716

1,209

Blue Springs

53,099

51,910

1,189

Raymore

15,530

14,449

1,081

Troy

9,862

8,948

914

St. Charles

62,304

61,450

854

Kansas City

444,965

444,199

766

All but two of Missouri’s major cities gained in this period, led by Columbia. Jefferson City gained 204 people, St. Joseph gained 59, Joplin 414 and Cape Girardeau 290. Springfield lost 403 individuals, and St. Louis 6,343, an almost 2 percent drop.

While many places in greater metro areas gained population, some inner ring suburbs lost population. Around St. Louis, University City lost 264 persons, Ballwin lost 248, Maryland Heights 222 and Florissant 481. Around Kansas City, Independence lost 758 persons, Grandview 286 and Raytown 411, a 1.4 percent decrease.

Worth County
Grant City, in Worth County, lost 25 people, making it the place with the largest percentage loss, 2.9 percent. All five of the county’s major places, in fact, dropped population: tiny Denver got tinier by one person, making it the state’s second largest percentage drop at 2.6 percent when it went from 38 to 37 people. Worth City lost two people, a 2.3 percent drop; Allendale lost one person, a 1.96 percent drop; and Sheridan four people, a 2.27 percent drop.

Worth County as a whole has experienced an estimated 6 percent decline in population from 1990 to 2004.

U.S.
Nationally, Elk Grove, a new city outside Sacramento, Calif., had the nation’s fastest growth rate among places over 100,000 at 11.6 percent. North Las Vegas was second at 11.4 percent, and Port St. Lucie, Fla., third at 11 percent. The top 25 places by percentage was entirely Sun Belt, with one exception: Joliet, outside Chicago, 4.1 percent.

Phoenix had the largest numerical population increase, 44,456 persons, followed by San Antonio, 21,420, and Forth Worth, 21,000. New York continued to be the most populous U.S. city, at 8.1 million, more than double the size of Los Angeles (second, at 3.8 million). Third was Chicago, at 2.8 million; Houston was fourth at 2.0 million and Philadelphia fifth at 1.5 million. Kansas City was 40th with 444,965 persons; St. Louis City 52nd  with 344,362.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates Program. 

 LINE


Contact Us                                                       MERIC Home